Sep 172013
 

Expo West banner horizontal

This week, Exponential begins its blog tour featuring several of the leaders speaking at the upcoming Exponential West conference (Oct. 7-10)—where they’ll be talking about the vital need for planting and growing multi-ethnic churches that can make disciples who reach an ever-changing multicultural world.

Ray ChangToday, my friend, pastor and church planter Ray Chang visits my blog. Ray is a church planter and trainer with the Evangelical Free Church of America. He planted and leads Ambassador Church in Brea, Calif., and he and I (with Peter Lim) lead Ambassador Network. As a Korean immigrant growing up in the Korean church, followed by internships and leadership positions in the evangelical church, Ray Chang has a learned a lot about what it means to invest in others and plant a multi-ethnic church. I asked him to share about his church, Ambassador Network and his leadership insights.

Why did you start Ambassador Church and Ambassador Network? What needs were you trying to meet?

I came to the States when I was 6. And when I came to America back in the ‘70s, the Asian-American community was relatively small. One of the challenges of growing up in an ethnic environment has always been, “How does Christ transcend culture?” So often, my culture was the thing that defined me as a Korean or as an Asian. So growing up in that context, serving in a Korean church, I felt frustrated because one of my biggest challenges was that I wanted to learn. I wanted to become a better pastor, I wanted to become a better leader. But because of my cultural context, there were a lot of limitations to that, whether it was a lack of mentoring or lack of discipling. So I left the Korean church, joined the Evangelical Free Church, and became an intern at EV Free Fullerton. And my eyes were just opened.

I saw ministry of the same gospel being applied in different ways, and it extended my opportunity to live out my faith. So that experience kind of, planted the seeds of, “Hey, what if we had a church that would be for all people?”

After that experience at Fullerton, I got a position as an associate pastor back at a Korean church in Washington, D.C. I remember looking at all of the different embassies and flags of the different nations. So that’s where the name Ambassador Church came from, II Cor. 5:20–that we are Christ’s ambassadors.

And so that became the foundation for planting Ambassador Bible Church, a multi-cultural church in the D.C. area, back in 1996. We had 11 people meeting in our apartment. We really didn’t know a lot about church planting, but in a year and a half we grew to about 150. [ed.note: and I, DJ Chuang, worked with Ray as an associate pastor at this multi-Asian/multi-ethnic church plant from 1997-2000]

We were reaching all these young adults and young couples and college students who had left the ethnic church. They were frustrated in the same ways I was frustrated. We felt the need to be a church that would represent all people, all nations. So the mission statement of our church became “to make and equip disciples of all nationalities as Christ’s ambassadors to all the nations.”

The second transition came in wanting to see how I can now help guys like myself. So at EV Free Fullerton where I served as outreach pastor, we started an Ambassador Fellowship, which was basically a training ground for five seminary students. That eventually became Ambassador Church.

The greatest concern I had was, “Okay, if we’re going to impact the nation, we’re going to have to impact young leaders.” There’s a whole segment of young leaders that will not be impacted, especially in the ethnic context. How do we pick these next second-generation guys and really invest in them? So while there’re a lot of national networks for church planters, a lot of these guys we’re discipling don’t have access to these kinds of networks yet. They have no point of relationship or connection. So it’s really hard for a young, second-generation Korean-American or Hispanic to go into some of these mainstream ministries. I felt like, “Why not take what God has given me, in this city, and see it as a benefit for the kingdom rather than as a curse?”

Growing up, I always struggled with my sense of identity. And I think a lot of kids, especially ethnic Americans, are asking, “Who am I? Am I Korean? Am I white? So I wanted to say, “Look, there’s a whole segment of young leaders out there that are not being ministered to or developed for leadership.” Ambassador Network really came out of that desire. We want to be a place, a bridge and connect these young leaders into some of these other things that God’s doing. We want to provide support, development and leadership for some of these kids.

What do you identify as some of the greatest challenges these leaders face today?

The greatest challenge these leaders face is that oftentimes their culture becomes the barrier to effective ministry. Part of it is that the senior pastor does want to relate, but they just don’t know how. It was never modeled to them. You can’t really blame them. And so part of my challenge, then, is to ask, “Ok, how do I change the paradigm? How do I change the process so that the next generation of leaders is empowered?

But how do you navigate that? How do you change the paradigm but still honor what they’ve been brought up in, and avoid a deconstruction movement? Or do you?

There’s something about deconstruction that’s arrogant—this idea that “we know what’s right and what you did in the past was wrong.” My philosophy is so different. I advocate taking the best of both worlds. For me, that was getting outside of my cultural context and working in a different context in an Anglo church, which I never had the opportunity to do. I liked some things there. But I also missed some things in my previous context as well. I was immersed in a non-Korean culture for a while and I learned so many things. I appreciated how a large and Anglo megachurch with a famous senior pastor works. And then I realized I could intersect all of these things in this new multi-cultural church.

The word “hybrid” is so popular now. I think life is sort of like that. To win every generation, you have to sort of take a hybrid of what is the best of everything based upon what’s happening. We have to let Scripture shape our culture. But we can learn from our culture and say, “Ok, how does this culture then reflect the image of God?”

What are you learning about pouring into leaders as a result of the work you’re doing with Ambassador Network and Ambassador Church, as well as your previous experience as a young leader?

Leadership development starts with a person, not a program. I think the No. 1 principle of any leadership development is assessment. You have to understand someone’s calling, their background, who they are. And that’s the uniqueness of the person. It’s like a football player. You can draft a quarterback and make that guy fit the system, or you can look at the player and say, “Okay, how can we make this guy succeed?”

Nobody is where they should be or where they will be. We are all in development. And part of our job as leaders is to help get leaders to go where God wants them to go. So one of the things that I say to a lot of young leaders is, “Look, my job as a pastor is to help you get to where God wants you to be.” And I am that transitional person. So I want to lead you and encourage you along that path. Really in some sense, that’s what discipleship is.

A support system is non-negotiable. One of the things that I’ve found among a lot of young leaders Is that more than the finance tools or a monetary investment in their church, what they need is people investment, life investment. Young leaders have always told me that they would rather have somebody invest in their life for the long haul versus a paycheck or donation.

It’s about life investment. My relationship with all the guys that we train is an ongoing coaching life relationship. What I never had as a young leader was that life coach who would stick with me all the way through. As a young leader in the Korean church, I served under a senior pastor I had one conversation with in two years, if that tells you anything. So I sort of live life with the philosophy that I want to do for someone else what was never done for me. It’s about the person, the individual. It’s about the disciple. We need the models and the learning—that’s all good—but the information is not what’s going to make planters succeed. It comes down to how we invest in them. Leadership development is about life. It’s a long-term commitment, a marathon instead of a sprint.

What about challenges related multi-ethnicity?

I think that’s the other challenge for us: How do we appreciate our identity without getting lost and use that as an advantage for the Gospel rather than seeing it as an obstacle? How do we take ethnicity and and reach the next generation without becoming exclusive, and without becoming ethnocentric?”

The reality is that we’re in an ever-changing culture and it’s going to be harder and harder for us to have the platform culturally. But the gospel is global. That’s the exciting thing. We have the opportunity to reach all people. And so I want to see a greater diversity.

We have to be faithful with what God has given to us. So hopefully for us, on a practical level, it’s to have the resources to be able to invest in young leaders, to be able to work with existing churches to help them become healthy so they can plant. So we’ve been doing a lot of stuff with existing ethnic churches and giving them a renewed vision for church and what it can be.

We also are looking for young leaders that we can bring into our residency program and invest in. I was talking to a church planting leader, and his philosophy is he only wants the best of the best, he only wants the first-round draft pick, you know, the cream of the crop. I guess, for his denomination, that’s the way they have to work, You only have a limited amount of resources to invest. But my philosophy is different. I want to invest in it whomever God brings to us to the best of my ability and build around that individual’s gifts. That’s what discipleship is—being open to the spirit of God bringing these people and doing whatever I can to help them.

Why do you think it’s important for us to think about multi-ethnic versus mono-ethnic?

The Great Commission is about all ethnicities, it’s “all people to the ends of the earth.” And Revelations is all about all nations, all tribes, all languages worshipping together at the feet of the Lamb. So we want to pursue that end.

The ultimate goal is really about reaching all people. And so we use the word multi-ethnic as sort of a larger tent. To say, this is the end goal of the Gospel is that all nations, all people, come to know Him and have the opportunity to hear the Gospel.

What are some of the principles or ideas that you’re communicating to these leaders about planting multi-ethnic churches, especially in an ever-changing culture?

Well, a friend of mine, Dr. David Anderson, pastors Bridgeway Community Church. He’s African American. I’m Korean American. And when I started planting, David’s church invested in us. He used to remind me to do three things:

You need to state your vision. Your vision has to be something that you state over and over again because people are not going to get it right away.

You have to stage your vision. You need to have people on stage reflect the people that you want to reach, whether they’re on your praise team, etc. But people need to see that you’re serious about diversity on every level.

You need to staff your vision. You have to make intentional progress toward bringing people of diverse ethnicities on your staff.

So those are the values. And when you do those things, you’re building a long-term process. So I think for multi-ethnic churches, there are a lot of misconceptions. Multi-ethnic churches have to focus on what unifies us, not what keeps us apart.

So Christ becomes the unifying factor.

The issue of diversity really is the challenges of the gospel. What does the gospel do? It breaks down the barriers between genders, race, culture, socioeconomic. When we break some of those barriers, we see who we are, created in the image of God.

In our church, we have about 70 percent Asian-Americans. But I would say that our church is multi-ethnic because among those 70 percent, we have Chinese, Filipino, Korean, Japanese and the 30 percent are non-Asian. They’re Hispanic, Anglo, most of my staff. I have more non-Asians on staff than I do Asians.

One of my prayers is that Ambassador Network becomes that bridge between the issues of diversity and multi-ethnicity, as well as reaching people in the next generation of ethnic Asian-Americans or multi-ethnic leaders. And the exciting thing for me is that God can do exceedingly more than what we’ve ever hoped and imagined.

 

At Exponential West, Ray Chang will be speaking in Session 2 with Rick Warren and Robert Coleman. If you can’t make it to the conference, you can still catch Ray’s session by registering to watch the free high-quality webcast. To see what workshops Ray will be leading at Exponential West, visit the conference’s mobile site. Find more information about Exponential West here.

 

Dec 302011
 

Pulling some data from Google Analytics and here’s what bubbled up as most popular from 2011, from all time, and featured posts I believe to be valuable and important.

Popular posts this year

  1. Least Churched Cities in America
  2. Top Church Pages on Facebook
  3. 30 emerging leaders listed in Outreach Magazine
  4. top 15 most popular varieties of apples
  5. 5 types of personal branding websites for web presence
  6. Table a free social network for just your church
  7. Perception of Asian Americans as a brand
  8. churches dying with dignity and recycling
  9. talking is the new texting
  10. Great Bible teachers you’ve never heard of

Popular posts from past years (“long-tail effect“)

  1. churches closing and pastors leaving (2010)
  2. How to stream and record video chat interview (2009)
  3. Emotional maturity and stages of development (2009)
  4. what is emotional maturity? (2008)
  5. video chat between Mac and PC (2006)
  6. how to develop emotional maturity (2008)
  7. emotional immaturity vs. emotional maturity (2008)
  8. evening worship around Washington DC (2006)
  9. Why I like Keller more than Piper (2006)
  10. perceptive differences between Asian and European Americans (2005)

Featured Posts from 2011

 

Jul 012011
 

Found this set of 5 questions in my inbox from a new visitor to my website / blog.
via http://dimland.blogspot.com/2011/04/dimland-radio-4-16-11-show-notes.html

I have few questions that I would like to ask:
1. Who is your primary audience for the website?
2. What is the vision of the website?
3. What is the mission of the website?
4. Where do you want to take your audience to?
5. What would be the primary reason why your audience member should log on to this website at least once per week?

Good questions. Essential questions for an organization. Good questions for people who want to have a personal mission statement or life plan.

I honestly do not think in those categories for myself. So I don’t readily have answers to offer along those lines. Nothing to hide. No secret agenda.

What I can describe is why I put time and energy into a website and blog, when a majority of other people choose to not. I know there are other people who won’t start a website or blog without answers for these 5 questions, not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Why do I blog? Because I can. This website and blog is an overflow of my being and a part of expressing who I am and what I think about.

I’m an ideas guy. I have lots of ideas, and they don’t do me much good if I just keep them to myself. So I share them freely. Bringing things to light. That’s what’s wonderful about the internet, people can share freely, and it can benefit 100s and 1000s.

I started blogging 12 years ago by sharing about my life. Back then it wasn’t called blogging, it was an online journal, a digital diary. My intent is to live my life as an open book with no pretense, and in so doing, my hope is that people can see how Christ has made a difference in and through my life, warts and all. I pace myself at 2 to 3 blog posts per week, and I don’t force it. If it doesn’t come, or if I don’t have the muse’s inspiration, I’ll miss a blog post or 2. (And that’s okay. Life is about grace, not performance, not a competition, not coercion.)

I share stuff on my website, lots of information and links. I post information that I’m interested in — things that don’t get enough attention and yet are important to me. There are plenty of websites and blogs for topics like news, tech, celebrity gossip, politics, business… and some of them make good money doing that, because lots of people are interested in those things. (So if you happen to be interested in a topic that lots of other people are interested in, you can make good money. If not, then, not so much.)

I’ll let you in on the back stories to why I built these destination web pages (in a barren land) and/or recurring themes of my blog:

multiethnic church – too many churches in America are unintentionally segregated. They’re stuck and they need help. Lots of help. This page has links that can help. There are other goodies out there now, good.

Asian American ministry – faith has to be contextualized and we’ve got too many issues in our next gen Asian American context that go unpublished, when the internet could be giving voice to our generation, empowering us, breaking stereotypes, giving grace and healing, connecting us for collaboration..

Tim Keller – before he became a popular author and conference speaker, he had pastored for years, and his sermons were a master mix of intelligence (not dumbed-down), culturally astute (not demonizing), and graciously kind (not belligerent).. I was introduced to him by a friend back in the early 2000s, and now that there are others pointing to his resources, I can move on to other topics..

Yogurtland – their website is built-in Flash. That makes them invisible to most search engines and to iPads and iPhones. I love their self-serve FroYo. They deserve to be visible and findable. People find my Yogurtland fan page, and I even get calls from people who want to open a franchise. I have not gotten any calls from headquarters, yet. (I could def kick up their social media strategy.)

These are some of those back stories. Any other ones you’d like to know?

So people find my website or my blog when they’re looking for an important topic that isn’t getting enough airplay on the web. Oh, and I should mention that I also love to experiment + discover new web apps that the average person could be using one day, and new ideas that can impact society and church. Could this be called thought leadership? Maybe. Maybe not.

I’d like to think people come back because they want to see what I’m thinking, what I’ve discovered, or what’s going on in my life. I know my Mom has my website as her home page. But other than that, I leave it up to the reader to choose their own reasons. I won’t impose or prescribe what people should do with all this info. I think my readers are smart enough to figure it out for their context.

Jun 212010
 

While the Multi-Site feature of WordPress 3.0 can run a network of multiple blogs, how to get there from existing WordPress blogs running on separate installations into one installation has been quite a learning process.

This blog post a place to share how I’m doing it, and please do add a comment as you learn how to do the export + import to merge your blogs together into one. These are the main steps, and may not include every single detail that may be required in your specific instance, since every web host setup may be different & unique.
Continue reading »

May 282010
 

Over the course of a decade, I’ve posted and/or gathered a ton of content here at djchuang.com. I’ve only started tagging my blog posts less than a year ago.

Here’s what I’ve tagged so far, at the time of this blog post: (for the live-updated list of tags, see the site map; and the top 5 tags are now converted to categories)

church
conference
event
Asian American
video
multiethnic
book

internet
blog
leadership
leaders
life
free
multiracial
ministry
interview

leader
culture
twitter
pastor
Christian
web
maturity
blogging
emotional

unconference
wetoku
conversation
Christmas
chat
online
social media
emergent
bible

relationship
faith
travel
live
innovation3
talk
worship
development
mentor

pastors
churches
personal
Starbucks
innovation
links
communication
emerging
theology

people
Dallas
power
mentoring
idea
gospel
listing
relationships
contest

ideas
media
missional
search
meetup
sex
English
health
presentation

change
sermon
discussion
coaching
religion
social
community
tips
directory

wifi
mobile
Obama
racism
diversity
conversations
webcam
emotions
prayer

tech
technology
networking
evangelical
lunch
color
America
time
audio

value
gathering
global
Chinese
question
Asian
job
holiday
tokbox

work
strategy
software
accounting
celebration
open
catalyst
context
Keller

world
google
relating
magazine
blackberry
opening
organization
orange
iphone

website
motivation
vacation
poll
feelings
WordPress
publishing
growth
God

race
spirituality
tour
database
values
experience
marriage
exponential
personality

convention
mission
practical
extrovert
introvert
results
non-profit
meeting
third culture

virtual
learning
sexuality
depression
survey
network
writing
recording
real

camp
connect
ethnicity
naked
pastoring
food
education
dialogue
bloggingheads

planting
resources
kingdom
fund
story
collaboration
authors
program
discipleship

review
year
embed
preaching
restaurant
blogs
honesty
opportunity
building

missions
lifestreaming
content
news
find
livestream
ideation
multi-site
racial

email
influence
webinar
webcast
saturday
words
churchtechcamp
mature
public

publish
character
spiritual
Korean
church2.0
creativity
chicago
12seconds
notebook

co-work
sms
McCain
expo
Saddleback
hotspot
korea
reading
friendship

books
list
social network
ustream
wellness
family
identity
relevant
justice

deciding
movie
inauguration
dc
speaker
branding
marketing
card
tweetup

fellowship
blogger
language
closing
thanks
SoCal
call
Irvine
greeting

OC
homeless
podcast
multiple
group
president
car
wear
coalition

developing
emotionally
new
q
events
carson
mercy
piper
future

insight
demographics
desk
office
library
portland
mouse
pad
grow

self
forum
history
emergence
lifechurch
slow
jeremiah
age
eq

intelligence
devotional
dna
chiropractic
perfection
sin
sinless
campus
political

Hawaii
balance
pace
rhythm
photos
develop
representative
space
programs

reproducing
Aliso Viejo
theooze
streaming
example
metaphor
vodcasting
coffee
cafe

gossip
debate
JetBlue
airline
podcasting
retire
birthday
disillusion
photo

essay
sna
airport
fedex
tired
curve
flight
Olympics
Beijing

michigan
stadium
commentsphere
commentosphere
city
vocabulary
soularize
schools
margin

blogosphere
comments
sorbetto
itunes
diary
froyo
filter
browser
chrome

vivanno
alpha
boundaries
men
women
update
theme
gratitude
busy

stereotype
least
unchurched
529
churched
most
cities
company
pain

sorry
apology
intent
Latino
Hispanic
resolution
conflict
finding
minority

college
funds
Santa
merry
eve
red
Urbana
paid
dinner

resource
Urbana09
word
normal
aid
scholarship
university
money
costs

controversy
easy
poverty
social justice
impact
distance
truth
traditional
interweb

howto
laptop
taboo
hot
videos
multisite
connection
whrrl
skype

twitcam
lifestream
journalists
return
foodie
cooking
reality
teaching
plan

schedule
tools
person
knowledge
energy
perception
remote
followers
capacity

reasons
information
data
small talk
philosophy
calendar
politics
market
notes

web app
economy
price
unpaid
volunteer
stress
transition
aggregator
fundraising

nonprofits
team
storytelling
partner
funding
reviews
auto
memory
Buggs

obituary
memorial
death
elite
southeast
autobiography
BBS
contributors
how to

preacher
feed
ecumenism
teacher
business
case studies
examples
metrics
ROI

worship leader
grief
youtube
class
keys
song
implementation
column
one

unity
ideacamp
reconciliation
cultural
gmail
release
press
apps
generosity

rescue
capital
gift
real estate
hire
strategist
disaster
haiti
donation

double
matching
consulting
contract
coach
philanthropy
help
care
access

nonprofit
articles
semantic
meaning
AIDS
gatherings
navigator
xbox
top

popular
Jesus
Christianity
process
formation
disciple
verge
dying
decline

attrition
statistics
skypecast
cereal
cost
contextualization
seminary
presidential
budget

evening
check
fact
bias
American
creating
decision
viewer
reader

judgment
Anthem
article
summit
why
documentary
washington
POTUS
healthy

confession
show
homosexuality
gay
skypepast
seminar
listen
homosexual
business card

connecting
lecture
last
USA
full
Randy
buzz
name
professor

Pausch
mom
spreadsheet
4wheel
thrill
mountain
colorado
gnomedex
party

vote
tie
security
offroad
deeper
competition
California
San Francisco
achiever

compete
friends
intimacy
thanksgiving
Orange County
homelessness
newsletter
goals
plans

habits
planes
trains
lifeline
growing
tunnels
random
traditions
religions

users
thoughts
immaturity
digital
pray
expression
interracial
strengthsfinder
strengths

method
traffic
A-list
brand
facilities
school
ABC
shortage
stream

feedback
preview
author
planning
strategic
Easter
wireless
forgiveness
action

calling
bluetooth
telecommuting
coworking
practices
record
Virginia
updates
realistic

optimism
tumblr
djchuang
fast
Philadelphia
dining
trip
representing
good

ethics
affairs
incarnation
moral
rules
hotspots
finder
ethical
friendships

anger
dynamics
design
foundation
woman
redesign
rural
bulk
edit

follower
following
campaign
makeup
challenge
ranking
bloggers
difficult
tough

image
beauty
websites
hard
manage
management
wisdom
vision
treasure

divorce
Durham
United States
revolution
movement
Carolina
talent
multiply
monkey

senses
tool
app
fish
Gibbons
simplicity
stages
Nashville
home

Apr 122010
 

What are the keys to effective team blogs, those blogs with multiple contributors? The most popular blog tools have the functionality for it: 1 blog with multiple authors. Some of the most popular blogs are team blogs, like Gizmodo [14], TechCrunch [7], Boing Boing [8], engadget, Lifehacker [6], ReadWriteWeb [10], Huffington Post [52], Gawker [11], twitip.com. [brackets denote number of contributors at time of this post]

Why aren’t there more team blogs as more normative for good blogging? The idea seems easy enough: get a team of bloggers to share the load of content generation, e.g. get 5 people to blog once a week, instead of 1 person blogging every weekday.

Launching a multi-author blog doesn’t magically beget popularity and large readership (if you’re into that; by the way, a large audience makes it easier to monetize and turn a blog into a profit-making venture, a la an advertising revenue model)

Here’s 3 things I’ve noticed about effective / successful team blogs:

  • hot topic: team blogs with lots of readers (and comments) are on popular topics that lots of people are interested in. Call it market-driven if you will. Hot topics = tech, celebrities, politics.
  • quality: gotta have great writing, great content, which comes from skill and passion and staying on topic
  • coordination: this isn’t a laissez-faire hands-off deal, someone has to actively coordinate and contributors ought to develop some system of communication with one another; content scheduling is one part of doing this; conductor-less orchestra is a rare exception

What would you add? Some other thoughts + insights about team-blogging ::

[mood: writing this blog on a Sunday afternoon in one of the larger Starbucks around, here in West Village of Uptown Dallas; lots of buzz and people all around.. with a lil reggae music in the background]

Feb 022010
 

2,000+ church leaders will converge in Austin this week at the sold-out VERGE missional church conference. Neil Cole describes Verge as “first of its kind in the missional church field.”

I’ll be there with the Verge Social Media Team, providing live coverage via various social media channels, and the team members’ websites + blogs + networks will host on-going conversations in a distributed fashion after the event.



The Verge team blog will link to all the latest — including announcement of the live video feed of main sessions. Live twitter tweets on twubs (below) + use official hashtag #verge10 + follow @djchuang247 for my live tweets.
Continue reading »

Aug 252009
 

Would you believe they made a movie based on a blogger? Yes indeedy!

Watched a movie on a date recently. I wanted to let the movie speak for itself. I did not go read up on all the reviews and view the trailer and read the Wikipedia entry and pre-release buzz. The neighbor was kind enough to let our son hang out. The movie? Julie & Julia.

And wouldn’t you know it… a movie about a blogger! A blogger who writes (types) for an anonymous audience. Over time, the audience grows. The bloggers’ confidence grows too. The blog entries get edited and supplemented into a book. And if that book gets lots of eyeballs too, then maybe it can become a movie. Here’s a link to Julie Powell’s original blog, Julie/Julia Project. And her current blog.

It took all of my restraint from elbowing my companion, since I’ve been a blogger since 1999 myself. Not that I’d want to have a movie made about me or anything.

Aside: The people that comprise the world’s market will reward (pay) for what they find valuable (be it entertainment or service or product). And for the rest of us who have value that doesn’t quite sync up with what the market price will bear, we still have value, lots of value. Just that it doesn’t translate into cash.

real Julie Powell   photos-of-movie-julie-powell

The real Julie Powell and the movie Julie Powell. Note that the real Julie Powell loves to use a lot more colorful language: “… I really ought to warn you about the language. I happen to believe that curse words are vital parts of the language, and I write accordingly. If you are not one of those people, you’re probably not going to be thrilled with J&J: The Book …” cf. Surreal is the new normal.

When will they make a movie based on Twitter?

Jul 242009
 

Thrilled to be in Dallas this week for the Ideation Experience hosted by Leadership Network. I didn’t spend much time at the laptop keyboard and made most of my time with f2f conversations. For great notes on the process of ideation and innovation, see http://jennicatron.tv

And, while it is possible to type on this smartphone, blogging thoughtfully does go so much better, and faster, on a full size keyboard.

To glance back at my week, look at my instablog http://daily.djchuang.com and my 24/7 twitter feed http://twitter.com/djchuang247

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